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The Latest Developments In Material Science, Material Application And Engineering

Your source for the latest news on material innovations, applications and processes from all over the world.

Corus develops new steel to aluminium welding technique

Detail of a aluminium steel connection

Corus, the international steel company, has developed "Fluxless Laser Brazing", a new and robust process for joining steel to aluminium during automotive production line assembly. The new technique has been developed at the Corus RD&T centre in Holland, to support the automotive industry's increasing use of multi-materials in new car design and manufacture, as a way of reducing weight and improving CO2emissions.

Read more: Corus develops new steel to aluminium welding technique

Designs on road safety

The DAF Trucks productline

Corus and DAF Trucks have collaborated to develop a computer simulation crash model that they believe will lead to safer future truck designs.

With road freight increasing across Europe, there is growing pressure on manufacturers to design safer trucks that protect the driver and other road users. In addition, improving the performance and truck containment of modern roadside crash barrier systems is an area that can greatly contribute to increased road safety.

DAF supplied its latest engineering data to Corus Tubes, based in Corby, UK. Using this data and working with DAF, Corus has been able to develop a crash simulation model, which has led to the development of a high containment barrier system for commercial vehicles. The collaboration now provides DAF with access to this crash simulation model based on the latest engineering data that can be used to enhance their own evaluation during new model development.

Read more: Designs on road safety

Material fitness

UK researchers have begun a joint project with a German university and Rolls-Royce to develop a cheaper and more accurate means of testing aerospace materials for metal fatigue. It is hoped the two-year project will provide a scientific breakthrough that will help make air travel safer by providing aeronautics engineers with more information about how fatigue affects aircraft components.

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Now racing cyclists can keep their cool

The Movaero

Professional racing cyclists often lose out in the compromise between aero- dynamics and comfort, sacrificing ventilation and neck comfort in favour of faster times.

Their aerodynamic helmets have a pointed rear tip that rests on their backs. This forces their heads into an uncomfortable fixed position, risking turbulence and slower times if they move.

Read more: Now racing cyclists can keep their cool

Greener Nylon

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have discovered an environmentally-friendly method of producing caprolactam, the precursor of nylon.

Nylon is currently manufactured in two double-step processes, each of which uses highly aggressive reagents and each generates four times as much ammonium sulfate as a by-product, and its disposal comes at considerable cost.

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Studies lead to new understanding of materials at extreme conditions

Example image of the new simulation technique

LIVERMORE, Califoria, USA - Researchers have found a new tool to explore materials at extreme conditions.

By combining very large-scale molecular dynamics simulationswith time-resolved data from laser experiments of shock wave propagation through specific metals, scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are now able to better understand the evolution of high-strain-rate plasticity.

Read more: Studies lead to new understanding of materials at extreme conditions

University of Delaware scientists use carbon nanotubes to detect defects in composites

Two University of Delaware researchers have discovered a means to detect and identify damage within advanced composite materials by using a network of tiny carbon nanotubes, which act in much the same manner as human nerves.

Read more: University of Delaware scientists use carbon nanotubes to detect defects in composites

University of Delaware scientists discover new class of polymers

Chris Snively and Jochen Lauterbach

They said it couldn't be done. And that's what really motivated UD polymer chemist Chris Snively and Jochen Lauterbach, professor of chemical engineering at UD.

For years, polymer chemistry textbooks have stated that a whole class of little molecules called 1, 2-disubstituted ethylenes could not be transformed into polymers--the stuff of which plastics and other materials are made.

Read more: University of Delaware scientists discover new class of polymers

New concept for high-voltage lines reduces magnetic fields

Wintrack high-voltage power lines pylon

TenneT and Holland Railconsult develop high voltage line featuring reduced magnetic field intensity.

TenneT in tandem with Holland Railconsult present a new high voltage line concept featuring significantly reduced magnetic field intensity compared to existing lines.

Read more: New concept for high-voltage lines reduces magnetic fields