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Tin

Description

Tin is a natural element in the earth's crust. It is a soft, white, silvery metal that does not dissolve in water. It is present in brass, bronze, pewter, and some soldering materials. Tin metal is used to line cans for food, beverages, and aerosols. Tin can combine with other chemicals to form compounds. Combinations with chemicals like chlorine, sulfur, or oxygen are called inorganic tin compounds (i.e., stannous chloride, stannous sulfide, stannic oxide). These are used in toothpaste, perfumes, soaps, food additives and dyes. Tin also can combine with carbon to form organotin compounds (i.e., dibutyltin, tributyltin, triphenyltin). These compounds are used to make plastics, food packages, plastic pipes, pesticides, paints, and pest repellents. Tin metal, and inorganic and organic tin compounds can be found in the air, water, and soil near places where they are naturally present in the rocks, or where they are mined, manufactured, or used.

General

Properties

Chemical properties

Minimum value Maximum value Unit Sources
%
%

Electrical properties

Minimum value Maximum value Unit Sources
kV/mm
%
-0.14 0.15 V Idemat 2003
0.12 0.12 Ohm.mm²/m Idemat 2003

Manufacturing Properties

Minimum value Maximum value Unit Sources

Mechanical properties

Minimum value Maximum value Unit Sources
MPa
MPa
MPa
5750 5750 kg/m³ Idemat 2003
%
MPa
J/cm
MPa
19 19 MPa Idemat 2003
MPa
9 9 MPa Idemat 2003
41400 44800 MPa Idemat 2003

Optical properties

Minimum value Maximum value Unit Sources

Thermal properties

Minimum value Maximum value Unit Sources
°C
228 228 °C Idemat 2003
°C
J/kg.K
W/m.K
35 35 e-6/K Idemat 2003

Environment

12 mPt
15.3 Pt
1510000 mELU
54.47 MJ/MJ
228 MJ
6.61 kg
0.1 kg
Tin is mainly found as SnO2 (cassirite) with a metal percentage of 55%. Important producers are: Brasil 23%, Malasia 14%, Indonesia 14% and China with 12%. Often (87%) in open mining. The amount of recycling is 8.7%

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